Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Tips for Combating Shin Splints


An Albuquerque-based attorney specializing in defending clients' constitutional rights, Geoffrey Scovil earned his juris doctor degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Law in 1996. He chose Case Western because it was close to Ashtabula, Ohio where his grandmother lived in the house where she raised her kids just down the street from her antique shop where she herself was raised during The Great Depression. Geoff Scovil was close to his grandmother who just passed away this year at the age of 96.

Family is important to Geoff Scovil. His favorite thing to do is enjoy sports - whether as a spectator or participant - with his family. He was an avid runner and cyclist who earned a varsity letter in numerous high school sports, including track and field and has played various sports ever since. 

One of the most commonly-occurring injuries for track and field athletes and beginner runners is shin splints. If ignored, the bone injury could progress to a stress fracture. However, if you rest appropriately and take other precautions, you can be back to running at full strength within three to six weeks. 

As soon as you begin to notice pain along the front outside or inside part of the leg, you should allow time for the injury to subside; take more rest days, lessen the distance and intensity at which you run, and never allow the pain to pass four on a scale of 1-10. Most importantly, if you do continue to run, it's imperative that you wrap your shin and ice the affected area afterwards to reduce inflammation. You can also do various exercises before and after running to alleviate pain such as walking on your heels for 30 seconds, on and off four times. Alternatively, you might consider other ways to train and stay in shape that won't affect your shins, such as swimming or bicycling.

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